—THE BEST REVIEWS

"A masterpiece–very wise and often hilariously funny."
“Hamann has created such a masterpiece, through the life of the protagonist Eveline, for the 1980s as Carson McCullers, Harper Lee, and J. D. Salinger did for earlier generations.”
“Space cannot adequately cover all the wisdom and just downright fun within this large, incisive novel.”

Literary, genuine coming of age stories truly reflect the psychological, social, economic, philosophical, and even geographical atmosphere of a particular age. H. T. Hamann has created such a masterpiece, through the life of the protagonist Eveline, for the 1980s as Carson McCullers, Harper Lee, and J. D. Salinger did for earlier generations. Eveline grows up in the classy Hamptons area of New York State and remains there until she moves to New York City to attend college. We read her very wise and often hilariously funny thoughts about every conceivable topic. We meet her first serious and rebellious boyfriend, Jack, who acts more like the father he despises but is totally ignorant of that fact. We note her descriptions of very famous New York landmarks, such as Stephen Talkhouse, named after a Montaukett Indian who walked all over Long Island and whose related Long Island Indian lore follows. Such minute detail may not be for the lighthearted reader but cleverly interweaves with characters who consciously and unconsciously move through life in an ignorant haze. Ranging from studying the nasty comments of catty friends to staunchly marching for women's rights to knowing what to say to brutally abusive men, Eveline remains strong yet sensitive. She is truly a heroic character, able to admit her errors and learn from them. Space cannot adequately cover all the wisdom and just downright fun within this large, incisive novel. Eveline best summarizes her essence, "I confront the myth of self-determination. Independence has not made me free, nor has it diminished my devotion ...I think what it means to love. First of course, there is the fact of you, then the fact of loving them, then somewhere along the way, the basic fact of them...What you do with it - accept, adore, deny or suppress - sort of determines everything. There are points of intersection, these divine assignments of the heart that complete you. Beautiful, H. T. Hamann - the entire story!”

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