—LIBRARY JOURNAL

"Henry James meets the 21st Century."
“Eveline is not a stereotypical "American Girl"; nor is the book a standard coming-of-age story.”

In her debut novel, Hamann takes readers on a five-year expedition into the mind of Eveline Auerbach as she finishes high school, leaves her mother's house in East Hampton, NY, and journeys back to the man she loves. But Eveline, or Evie, is not a stereotypical "American Girl"; nor is the book a standard coming-of-age story. Although the driving theme is the powerful attraction between Eveline and Harrison Rourke, the book derives its strength from Evie's "vision," her way of observing the people, events, and objects around her. Always intelligent and insightful, Evie thinks deeply with an honesty and naturalness that are refreshing and often amusing; she may be an odd duck, but she often perceives things in a way that rings true. When her optometrist wonders why she squints despite her 20/20 vision, Evie reflects that she squints to see differently, not better. Readers may find that this book causes them to do just that. A sort of Henry James meets the 21st century, this novel might be slow going for some readers but will intrigue those who are not afraid of the English language. Recommended for larger public and academic libraries.

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